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Floor Plans

To better explain Mcmillan House I’ve included a series of site plans and floor plans for your review. As shown on the site plan, the lot was a pie shaped remnant tract resulting from a 1934 lot split. McMillan House is a text book “In-Fill” project where site constraints drove design decisions. The result was a balanced site/structure union.

Mouse over caption at left to hide and view full image. Click here to begin the tour again.

Site Plan

McMillan House in Context

1st Floor Simple Plan

2nd Floor Simple Plan

1st Floor Detailed Plan

2nd Floor Detailed Plan

Site Plan

  • Detailed plans available upon request.

McMillan House in Context

  • Detailed plans available upon request.

1st Floor Simple Plan

  • Detailed plans available upon request.

2nd Floor Simple Plan

  • Detailed plans available upon request.

1st Floor Detailed Plan

  • Detailed plans available upon request.

2nd Floor Detailed Plan

  • Detailed plans available upon request.

Overview

When platted in 1907, the original lot was twice as large. The lot was split in 1934 and the vacant portion remained fallow for 70 years. In 2003 the neighborhood was granted Historic Preservation status, which means new construction must receive a Certificate of Appropriateness from the Landmarks Commission. McMillan House did so with a unanimous 5-0 vote. The idea isn’t to fool people into believing the house was built in an earlier era, but rather design a structure that “fits” in scale, bulk, proportions, materials, etc. relative to the context of its surroundings. The Secretary of Interior provides Standards for Rehabilitation that includes guidelines for new construction in a historic district.

Site Plan

As referenced earlier, the lot was a pie shaped remnant tract resulting from a 1934 lot split. The footprint of the house is shown on the Site Plan as the shaded region. As a pie shaped lot there were five foot (5’) side yard setbacks and a 30’ front yard setback. In addition to the 30’ front yard setback the historic district stipulates a new building facade must align with the adjacent structure. In our case we aligned the NW facade with the dark brick home to the north (on left) and the garage facade with the stone home to the south (on right).

We designed a structure that “fits” contextually in scale, bulk, proportions, materials, etc. to its surroundings by taking our cues from adjacent structures. For example if you step back fifty paces and squint you can see how McMillan House relates to the existing home on its left. The pitch of the roofs are similar; each have windows across the second story facade; one has a strong white horizontal element, the other has a copper one; each have a bank of three windows separated by either a brick or stone field; one has brick below stucco above, the other has stone below wood above. McMillan House introduces fields of stone which help tie it contextually to the two story stone house on its right.

First Floor

The first floor plan gives you a solid orientation of the open “loft like” floor plan of the house. The living room is largely defined by a wall of windows, built-in bookshelves and the sectional sofa. Behind the sofa is the entry area defined with the aid of a 5’x8’ Persian rug and the exposed elevator wrapped by a staircase ascending to the second floor and descending to the basement. The living room then spills into the kitchen and ricochets into the dinning room. A kitchen island with a 36” breakfast bar on one side and gas range on the other buffers the kitchen from both the living room and the dining room. South end of kitchen is anchored by a walk-in pantry and a mail/phone desk. North end is anchored by a bank of built-in ovens accessible from wheelchair height.

The dinning room is nestled in the far southwest corner with a bank of floor-to-ceiling windows and a glass door exiting to the back yard. At the far northeast corner of the house rest the guest bedroom with its own exit door to the back yard. Sandwiched between the guest bedroom, the kitchen, and dining room is the first floor bathroom. This bathroom has two doorways, one accessing the guest bedroom, the other accessing the dining room. All the interior doors are maple veneer pocket doors which are attractive, functional, and save space.

Second Floor

Consistent with the open floor plan “loft like” design of the first floor, the second floor is essentially a master living suite. Accessed via the elevator or its wrap around staircase, the second floor’s cathedral ceilings give it a voluminous feel. The south end is anchored by an L-shaped desk and a standing frame (a NordicTrack for paraplegics). Similar to the first floor, the living area of the second floor is defined via furniture, built-in entertainment center and a wall-mounted flat screen television. At the far left of the built-in cabinet is a small refrigerator and to the left of that is a built-in wet-bar with an electric kettle. The idea being once you’re on the second floor you can make yourself refreshments without returning to the first floor.

The master bedroom is defined by a partial wall separates it from the stairwell. As is typical of open floor plan lofts there are no closets but rather an armoire for storing bed linens and blankets. Flooring in the master suite is 3 1/2” wide plank No.2 white oak with a heavy mahogany stain. Exiting the master suite is a wide tiled hallway leading to the master closet/dressing/laundry room with the master bathroom on the left, and the roof deck on the right.

Click on an image below to tour different parts of McMillan House.

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